All Great Leaders are Readers: #staffpicks

All Great Leaders are Readers: #staffpicks

 

1. Harry Potter Series by J.K. Rowling

J.K. Rowling is a literary genius, there’s no doubt about it. If you have not read her HP series, run – do not walk – to buy all of them. I just finished rereading the series from start to finish for the third, maybe fourth time; I kid you not. I remember waiting for each novel to come out; I grew up with these books – along with the majority of our generation. You’ll pour over these pages, laugh until you cry, and end each chapter wanting more. Each character you’ll meet in HP has at least one lesson to teach you, whether it’s about life, leadership, what have you.

Note: the books are not like the movies. If you hate reading, this series will change your train of thought. The movies are phenomenal, but the books are 10x better.

 

2. David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell

David and Goliath is the classic Old Testament tale of an underdog who vanquishes a mighty warrior against all odds. Gladwell provides an argument that enlightens the reader and sheds new light on an old story. His assessment uncovers how we have missed the true meaning of how underdogs defeat mighty warriors. This book is for anyone whose interests lie in psychology, business, politics, history, science, and the like.

For a taste of his book, you can check out his TED Talk here:

http://bit.ly/1iNcnar

 

3. Start With Why by Simon Sinek

Sinek is a leadership scholar who formulates a theory that most companies and leaders don’t grasp, which is starting with why. This is how great leaders inspire action. This book is not just for CEO’s of Fortune 500 companies or business majors. The simple yet powerful theory can even apply to student leaders who lead campus organizations.    

For a taste of his book, you can check out his TED Talk here:

http://bit.ly/OX0t5a

 

4. Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

J.D. Salinger’s calling card is Catcher in the Rye, a coming of age story of a young man named Holden Caulfield who sees the world differently than his peers. In a sense, this novel inspires the reader to never stop questioning the status-quo and to continue living life to its fullest. The plot of the story is interesting enough to make it one of the most heralded novels of all time, but it is also on the banned book list in many states and schools. Holden captivates the reader, and readers will be laughing at the decisions he makes and on the edge of their seats with the predicaments. Anyone who enjoys a short read with colorful dialogue and boys full of charisma and charm, Catcher in the Rye is the go-to book.

 

5. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt

Though Amazon categorizes this work as “True Crime,” Berendt’s vivid characters meander across its pages as caricatures of the Old South in the modern world. For anyone who likes a good “whodoneit,” this is a read for you. Told from the view of a non-native Northerner, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil narrates the murder trial of a prominent Savannah socialite and will leave you laughing and turning pages until you’ve found the truth.

 

6. A Year of Yes by Shonda Rhimes       

Shonda Rhimes is the writer (aka mastermind, brainchild, brilliance) of ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, and How To Get Away With Murder. In her book A Year of Yes, she recounts personal stories of how she has changed her life by saying “yes” to things for which she typically does not have time - speaking engagements she usually respectfully declines due to her introverted personality, for example. Shonda is #bae. 

 

Feature photo: Roya Ann Miller/ VIA Unsplash.

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